Quantcast






Did the Queen Really Shade Donald Trump?

By  |  0 Comments

U.S. President Donald Trump shocked the people of Great Britain this past week by walking ahead rather than beside of Queen Elizabeth II during his state visit there. However, the bigger news since then has been an internet theory that the Queen threw subtle shade at the president by wearing the “American state visit brooch.”

Donald Trump met Britain’s 92-year-old monarch at Windsor Castle on Friday, July 13, 2018, as part of of two-day official trip. At one point while ceremonially inspecting the guard with the queen, the president walked in front of her and paused, requiring her to walk around him.

Many were curious as to how the president would behave while greeting the Queen because of his notorious firm, lengthy handshakes. Although bowing to the monarch is not a mandatory royal protocol, it is traditionally a sign of respect, and the Brits were displeased with Trump’s decision to greet the Queen with only his trademark handshake.

According to the White House’s schedule, President Trump was to spend 25 minutes with the Queen, but the tea time was cut short after he arrived late. Meanwhile, thousands of protesters demonstrated in the streets of London against president’s visit.

 

 

The day before they met, on July 12, the Queen wore a brooch that was reportedly gifted to her from President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama in 2011. This was done intentionally, to send a message as the protesters had, according to some on the internet. Twitter user SamuraiKnitter apparently originated the “Brooch Warfare.”

 

Another explanation for the Queen wearing the vintage (1950) American-made brooch with 14-karat yellow gold, diamonds and moss agate was that it matched the dress she wore on July 12th. She wore a creme dress with green floral-looking print while hosting the Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby, and Ahmad al-Tayeb, a Sunni Muslim cleric and High Imam of al-Azhar in Egypt.

 

While some are fixated on “Brooch Gate,” the U.S. 2018 midterm campaigns are in full swing. With Republicans fighting to hold their majority in Congress, the focus should probably instead be on midterm elections on Tuesday, November 6, 2018. At that point, there will be no need for further debate about who is sending a real message.

 

Annette Johnson
Editor

 

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *